Category: Product Reviews

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    Dept H. Blends Murder Mystery With Disaster Movie

    It can be difficult to classify a comic like Dept H. One part murder mystery, one part disaster movie, one part “ragtag misfits out to save the world,”. The story takes you through a labyrinthine saga that proves just as deep as the very ocean the characters are exploring.

    Dept H. #14 at TFAW.com

    The best thing to do is to simply say it’s great.
    The story itself isn’t terribly unique – taking obvious cues from movies like Deep Blue Sea and/or The Abyss. What makes it so enjoyable is how Matt Kindt and Sharlene Kindt tell it. The characters are fully realized, and in issue 14 we finally learn just how deep (pun intended) Jerome is. He’s either not as insane as we thought, or he might be a good deal more. Genius tends to have that effect on people. Yet Matt and Sharlene’s storytelling makes him so relatable to the point where we, the readers, understand why he does what he does (I won’t reveal it here, for fear of spoilers).

    By issue 14, we already know that Dept H was initially formed to explore space. But was changed to head to the bottom of the ocean (an equally unexplored void). Issue 14 gives the readers a terrifyingly relevant, and believable, reason why that gives so much more gravity (pun intended) to the characters and their actions. Hari’s kindness may have been his own undoing, but until the killer is finally revealed, we’ll never know if it was Jerome (who is the obvious suspect) or any of the other characters with a reason to sabotage Dept H.

    As far as the art is concerned, I’ll be honest, at first threw me off because it doesn’t fit into the standard superhero style. The lines aren’t always clean, the colors can be muddy and washed out, and there’s a lot of sheer darkness. This is, I realize, all on purpose. After all, how else would you illustrate a murder mystery that takes place on the sandy floor of the ocean itself? If some of the panels weren’t drab, how else would the gorgeous colors stand out? Pages 19-22 alone are a class in color and scope, and my early fears about the artwork are obliterated. Matt’s pencils are good, but it’s Sharlene’s colors that take the images and makes them fascinating.

    Dept H. blends genres in an enticing way that makes it more approachable than a lot of comics. It’s one of the best things about this series. Fans of serial adventure, exploration, mystery, character-driven plot, and realistic intrigue are going to be sure to find Dept H. a solid read that’s well worth their time.

    If you haven’t been following it so far, pick up Vol. 1 and 2 and you’ll be ready to dive right in (pun intended).

    Dept H. #14, Dark Horse Comics, Released May 24th 2017, Written and Drawn by Matt Kindt and Sharlene Kindt, $3.99

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    Mass Effect: Discovery #1 Uncovers a Dark Secret in the Andromeda Initiative

    Mass Effect: Discovery #1 is one of the most anticipated comic releases of the year. This comic promises to dive deeper into the Andromeda Initiative introduced in March’s Mass Effect: Andromeda video game. Dark Horse is no stranger to Bioware’s many video game worlds, but this is one the most promising storylines in their partnership. The first issue alone delivers on several of the promises made to fans during the initial production of the game. Namely, it uncovers significant dangers lurking in the Initiative’s long cast shadow.

    Mass Effect: Discovery #1 Review

    It comes as no surprise that this story is compelling when you look at the creative team bringing it to life. John Dombrow, lead writer for both Mass Effect 3 and Mass Effect: Andromeda, has written a story that ties heavily back into the events of Andromeda. Artist Gabriel Guzman illustrates the comic, subtly luring readers back into the Mass Effect universe. He does this through incredible images that seamlessly recreates the iconic imagery of the games. His attention to detail hints at deeper connections to the greater Mass Effect storyline.

    Mass Effect: Discovery #1 Contains a Compelling Story

    The story itself is mostly told in flashback. The reader meets a side character from the game, Tiran Kandros, as he is reeling in the aftermath of a battle. Kandros, who is the leader of Nexus’ militia in Andromeda, is a much more significant character than the game would have you believe. While Tiran is just another NPC in the game, this comic shows us how he is so much more.

    Iran is a spy, infiltrating the Andromeda Initiative through the Nexus colony. The player only receives a few tidbits of information about Tiran’s life from before you meet him in the game. However, this comic blows apart any banal conceptions a player might have had of him. Despite his background role in the game, as the comic unfolds, it’s clear that Tiran is one of the most integral characters in the story of Andromeda. Through Tiran, we glimpse into not only the Turian perspective on the Initiative, but the resistance against it as well.

    Mass Effect: Discovery hits the shelves Wednesday, May 24th. Make sure to grab a copy at TFAW.com and don’t miss the beautiful variant cover by artist Kate Niemczyk. Until then, guys, keelah e’lai.

    Check out all of our Mass Effect products!

    Mass Effect: Discovery #1, Dark Horse Comics, Released May 24th, 2017. Written by Jeremy Barlow and John Dombrow, Art by Gabriel Guzman, Cover by Michael Atiyeh. $3.99

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    Batman #23: The Brave and the Mold Review

    Batman #23 starts off with a bang – two bangs actually.

    Batman #23 Review

    We see a man reciting the lyrics to “My Wild Irish Rose” as he is being shot in the head twice. The man seemingly continues to recite the words after he’s died.

    The dead man, it turns out, is Swamp Thing’s father. The plant elemental shows up at the crime scene as Batman and Commissioner Gordon are trying to figure out how the killer came in through the 86th floor window. The resulting investigation is a superhero team-up for the ages.
    However, it takes a close second to the other dynamic duo – writer Tom King and artist Mitch Gerads, the pair behind the critically acclaimed “The Sheriff of Babylon.” As with that series, Batman #23 is a tale doesn’t disappoint.

    Batman #23 Is Swamp Thing’s Rebirth

    King spins a tight yarn complete with mystery, drama, revenge and a bit of pathos on the side. With his recent work on the book, King is proving himself to be a worthy successor to longtime Dark Knight scribe Scott Snyder. As compelling as the story is, it’s Gerads’ visuals that bring the story home. His Batman – normally the dominant figure in every panel – is dwarfed by Swamp Thing. It’s appropriate since ultimately, it’s really Swamp Thing’s story.

    Gerads shades each chapter with its own color – green when we first see Swamp Thing rising from a small plant, shades of gray as the man is being shot, browns to match the mahogany walls of stately Wayne Manor. It’s an excellent visual effect which really adds an extra layer of depth to this fantastic tale.

    The surprise ending is every bit as emotional as it is gruesome, leaving nearly every character as a victim. Everyone, that is, except the reader, who will be thrilled with this great story.

    Love Batman? Then be sure to check out Dark Days: The Forge!

    Batman #23, Marvel Comics, Released May 17th, 2017, Written by Tom King, Art By Mitch Gerads, $2.99

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    Generation X #1: Talking ’bout My Generation

    In all the acts of superheroics and protecting the Earth from calamity, it’s sometimes easy to forget that X-Men is ostensibly a book about a school. We all know the Xavier Institute secretly houses the X-men and all their crime fighting gear; however, it’s also home to a group of scared and confused young mutants just learning their powers. These young people are the focus of the latest X-title Generation X #1.

    Generation X #1 Review

    In this first issue we meet a ragtag group of new mutants just entering the institute. Headmaster and X-Men team leader Kitty Pryde can’t possibly juggle all the responsibilities of her demanding positions. So, she’s called in everybody’s favorite 90’s mallrat Jubilee to help mold these youngsters into a new team of heroes.

    It’s a big thrill for longtime X-Men readers to see Jubilee step into a leadership position. For so long, she’s been the kid sister of the team, and to see her come into her own and become a mentor to young mutants is very satisfying.

    Generation X #1 Starts Off Strong

    One of the strengths of this first issue is its focus on character, and rather than leaping directly into super villain fighting, we get a sense of the characters and their dynamics. This team has a lot of dysfunction: It’s clear these characters are young and unproven. There’s much infighting and self-doubt, and this will no doubt be the center of conflict for issues to come.

    Generation X #1 feels like the right step in the continuation of the Marvel X-Men relaunch. It’s a direct appeal to a younger market who will no doubt relate to this mismatched bunch of characters. A treat for X-readers new and old, Generation X #1 is another success for Marvel’s Resurrxion relaunch.

    The X-Men are back and better than ever! Check out all of our Resurrxion comics!

    Generation X #1, Marvel Comics, Released May 17th, 2017, Written by Christina Strain, Art by Amilcar Pinna, Cover by Terry Dodson, $3.99

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    Babyteeth #1: Buffy The Vampire Slayer Meets Rosemary’s Baby

    Donny Cates (Redneck, God Country, Ghost Fleet) is back at it again. This time, he’s partnered with Garry Brown (Black Road, John Carter: The End) to bring us Babyteeth #1, a story of the not-so-immaculate conception and birth of the Antichrist. Where does this not-so-immaculate conception take place? In Salt Lake City Utah, of all places.

    Sadie Ritter is a pretty normal teen, except for one thing. She’s pregnant, and her baby is the Antichrist. While you might expect this story to unfold in the exact opposite manner as the Nativity, it’s actually pretty innocent. That is, if you can get past the mystery of the baby’s father and the massive earthquakes that coincide with Sadie’s contractions. There’s also the matter of the destruction of the barriers between earthly and demonic planes.

    Sixteen Years Old, Nine Months Pregnant with the Antichrist


    Babyteeth #1 Review

    When asked about Babyteeth in an exclusive interview with TFAW last month, Donny Cates gave us the elevator pitch. “Sadie Ritter is sixteen and pregnant with the Antichrist. Once the baby is born, all hell comes with it. It’s very sweet.”

    Garry Brown’s art style is well known for beautiful brutality. The depth of detail Brown provides in the landscape and scenery makes the modern day setting of Salt Lake City jump off the page. The expressive detail he lends to the characters’ faces sells Cates’ script beautifully and helps make Babyteeth a highly emotional read.

    Donny Cates Knocks It Out of the Park in Babyteeth #1

    Everything Donny Cates is writing these days is pure gold. With God Country currently in its fourth printing, Redneck already going back to press for it’s second run, and the brilliant showing here by Cates and Brown, Babyteeth #1 will undoubtedly fly off the shelves as well.

    MAKE SURE TO CHECK OUT THE REST OF BABYTEETH!

    Babyteeth #1, Aftershock Comics, release date June 14, 2017, co-created and written by Donny Cates, co-created and art by Garry Brown, color by Mark Englert, letters by Taylor Esposito, logo by John J. Hill, $3.99

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    Redneck #3: Slap’s dead. Cattle’s dead. BBQ shop’s in ashes.

    In Redneck #1 and #2, we met the Bowman clan, a three-generation clutch of vampires living on the outskirts of a small East Texas town. There is an uneasy sort of truce between the Bowmans and the Landrys, a family in Sulphur Springs that is aware of the Bowmans’ true nature.

    After one of his boys is brutally murdered, JV tries his level best to avoid an all out war with the Landrys. JV locks Seamus and Greg in the basement and sends the brood’s two familiars, Phil and Evil, into town to try to negotiate with Father Landry. Chapter two ends with an armed standoff on the front porch of the Bowman ‘stead.


    Redneck 3 Review

    The only witness to what actually happened the night Slap was killed is Bartlett, and he was too drunk to remember anything. There’s a possibility that one of the clan’s two psychics can root around in his head and find the memories he’s suppressing; however, Perry’s too young, and Bartlett is terrified of Granpa.

    I asked Donny Cates to sum up chapter three for us, and this is what he had to say: “The Bowman boys are unhinged and unleashed, and only JV can stop them. In the meantime, Bartlett must face his darkest fears and have a conversation with the mysterious monster in the attic. Meet Granpa everyone…God help your soul.”

    Bartlett Confronts the One Sonuvabitch That Puts Fear in Other Vampires in Redneck #3

    Redneck continues to deliver a compelling, emotional story about loyalty, family, and coming to terms with the past. Lisandro Estherren’s rough pencils and Dee Cunnife’s muted palette bring Cates’ script to life in a gritty way that is purely East Texas.

    Redneck is one of those stories that you will look back on and wish you had gotten in on the ground floor. Snag copies of these first books while you can.

    THIS BRUTAL SOUTHERN GOTHIC TALE IS A MUST READ

    Find our review of Issues #1 and #2

    Redneck #3, Image Comics, Released June 28th 2017, Written by Donny Cates, Art by Lisandro Estherren, Color by Dee Cunniffe, $3.99

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    Star Wars: Screaming Citadel (One Shot): In Space No One Can Hear Your Lightsaber

    Marvel’s latest Star Wars crossover unites two unlikely characters, Luke Skywalker and Doctor Aphra. It’s a combination that probably shouldn’t work, but somehow does under the skillful pen of writer Kieron Gillen. More importantly, the Screaming Citadel one shot helps to fill in some of the gaps in Luke Skywalker’s path to becoming a Jedi Knight.

    Star Wars Screaming Citadel (One Shot)
    Despite their different allegiances, the characters need each other. Luke feels the Force, but has no real training to become a Jedi. Aphra wants to unlock the power in an artifact she recovered. The irony of the situation isn’t lost on Gillen. After a grueling cantina fight (Luke can’t seem to avoid them), he accuses Aphra of being evil. “Evil is a very strong word,” she replies.

    Aphra convinces Luke to accompany her to the Screaming Citadel to unlock the mystery of her artifact – and to get him the training he desperately needs. However, the price the pair has to pay for that knowledge is could end up being too high.

    Screaming Citadel Is Star Wars At Its Best

    Artist Marco Checchetto gets to play with lots of Star Wars toys in this premiere issue. Checchetto has no problem drawing Wookies, Twi’leks, Toydarians, and even a Gungun (though hopefully not Jar Jar Binks). Our favorite characters, including Leia and Luke, are easily recognizable, right down to the smirk on Han Solo’s face.

    Despite the dire circumstances, Gillen keeps the mood light with his irreverent characters, including Doctor Aphra and her two droids. Where R2-D2 and C-3PO frequently save the heroes lives, Aphra’s abominations gleefully plot the torture of everyone they meet. Aphra herself is a welcome change to the Star Wars universe – think of a female Han Solo with even more selfish motives.

    “Two people and a Wookie versus a bar?” she says. “That’s what I call the start of a great weekend.”

    It’s also the start of a great series.

    Like the first issue? We’ve got the issues you need to continue the story!

    Star Wars: Screaming Citadel #1, Marvel Comics, Released May 10, 2017; Written by Kieron Gillen; Art by Marco Checchetto; Colors by Andres Mossa; Lettering by VC’s Joe Caramanga; $4.99.

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    Rocket Takes On One Last Job In Rocket #1

    When one thinks of the Guardians of The Galaxy it’s impossible not to immediately conjure up images of Rocket. He’s everyone’s favorite roguish raccoon (though don’t let him catch you saying that). Fresh off his critically acclaimed appearance in Guardians of The Galaxy Vol. 2, Rocket launches into a new solo series all his own, the appropriately titled Trash Panda #1 Rocket #1.


    Rocket #1 Review
    We initially find Rocket in a bar regaling the bartender with tales of his recent Earthbound adventures. Into the bar walks Otta, an old flame from Rocket’s past who left him jailed and heartbroken last he saw her. Of course, she needs his help, which involves Rocket returning to his criminal ways. Rocket is obviously suspicious, but with the fate of Otta’s planet at stake he just can’t help but get involved.

    Writer Al Ewing crafts an extremely clever intergalactic crime story in Rocket #1. This book is as much Ocean’s 11 as it is Guardians of The Galaxy. The idea of Rocket using his natural raccoon abilities of hypersensitive touch and hearing to be a safecracker is ingenious. Ewing also uses the plot to paint Rocket as a reformed thief trying to avoid getting pulled back into the game. It’s a nice reminder that the Guardians characters exist in a darker, more crime-ridden part of the Marvel Universe.

    Rocket #1 Is Some Of Ewing’s Best Work Yet


    Artist Adam Gorham obviously has a ball creating a ragtag crew of animal inspired aliens. Seeing Rocket and his crew in stylish matching suits plays into the fun, caper vibe of the comic. It’s exactly the kind of story and attitude we expect of Rocket and it’s clear from this first issue that he’s in the hands of a perfectly matched creative team.

    If you’ve seen the movies or loved the Guardians comics and just can’t enough of this acerbic raccoon, then Rocket #1 is the perfect jumping on point for his solo adventures.

    I AM GROOT

    Rocket #1, Marvel Comics, Released May 10th, 2017, Written by Al Ewing, Art by Adam Gorham, Cover by Mike Mayhew, $3.99

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    Dragon Age: Knight Errant #1 Brings us back to Kirkwood

    Those familiar with the Dragon Age series know that the world of Thedas has a rich undercurrent of stories that are just waiting to be told, and one such tale is the subject of Dragon Age: Knight Errant #1. Even if you haven’t played through the popular Bioware franchise, this comic stands up on its own merits. While there are elements that people who are completely new to the world will not understand fully, I have hope that the subtle storytelling of the writers will integrate the information in later issues to better introduce new readers to their world. For long-time fans of the series, there are several nods to previous events in the games and to the first comics miniseries by Dark Horse, Magekiller.

    Dragon Age: Knight Errant #1

    In the latest team-up between Bioware and Dark Horse comics, Dragon Age fans are introduced to a young rogue named Vaea. Vaea is squire to the much venerated knight Ser Aaron Hawthorne, who is drunk not just on wine, but also on his imaginings of his own glory. However, Vaea is more than just a simple servant to the grandiose man; she is also an elf motivated by the plight of her people. Using Ser Hawthorne’s influence to travel, Vaea steals in order to share with the disenfranchised elves who are sequestered in the alienages of Thedas.

    Dragon Age: Knight Errant #1 Sees Many Popular Characters Return

    We first meet Vaea as she and her patron are on their way to Kirkwood to visit fan favorite Varric Tethras as he’s on the edge of being appointed Viscount of the troubled city. While Ser Hawthorne is busy spinning drunken tales to a party held in Varric’s honor, Vaea sneaks out to meet up with a former Templar named Ser Nevin Faramore. Faramore had worked directly for Knight Commander Meredith before she was destroyed by Red Lyrium at the end of the second Dragon Age video game.

    Faramore hires Vaea to sneak into the Gallows to retrieve a box of treasures that Commander Meredith had hidden before her death, to which only he possesses the only key. What follows reveals Vaea’s true character as she instead steals the key away from Faramore in order to bring the treasure to the elves of Kirkwood.

    Vaea’s Robin Hood-esque endeavors don’t go unnoticed, however. Almost immediately, Varric shows interest in the woman, quickly recognizing that she is up to more than she seems and giving her the nickname of “Fingers.” Vaea is also approached by a mysterious woman, who insinuates that Vaea has stumbled into a situation much larger than she had originally bargained for through veiled threats about the Inquisition.

    Politics and Action Combine in Dragon Age: Knight Errant #1

    This story promises to explore the schism between elves and humans in the world of Thedas, a schism that has been the source of unending strife since the beginning of the franchise. In one scene, the reader is shown a blithely racist conversation happening amongst a bunch of well-to-do humans while Vaea has to placidly stand by. In addition to this, there are conversations about slavery, poverty, and the wars that have marred the landscapes of Thedas for generations.

    Whether you’re a long time fan of Dragon Age or completely new to the series, this comic is engaging and lures you deeper into the world that Bioware has made for their incredible games. While this first issue is peripheral to the main storyline of the series, the overall tale hints that it will reveal some secrets left over after the end of the last game.

    Between the compelling new characters and at least one returning fan favorite, Dragon Age: Knight Errant #1 will draw you deeper into Kirkwood and the dangers that hide in its shadows.

    Hungry for more Dragon Age products? We’ve got playing cards, graphic novels, patches, and more!

    Dragon Age: Knight Errant #1, Dark Horse, Released May 10th, 2017, Writer: Nunzio DeFilippis, Christina Weir, Artist: Fernando Heinz Furukawa, Colorist: Michael Atiyeh, Cover Artist: Sachin Teng, $3.99

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    Secret Empire #1: Hail Captain America!

    Secret Empire #1

    Never have the words “Hail Hydra” packed more of a wallop than when they are uttered by that star-spangled Avenger, Captain America, in Secret Empire #1. However, that’s now the situation facing the Marvel universe in the publisher’s latest event.
    Secret Empire #1
    As seen in Secret Empire #0, Cap has engineered the rise of Hydra by trapping most of the heroes in space or in the Darkforce. The book opens with a time skip, showing that Cap’s coalition of Hydra forces now control the United States – and have their sights trained on the rest of the world. Only a handful of good guys remain, led by Hawkeye and Black Widow.

    Secret Empire #1 Raises the Stakes

    In the hands of writer Nick Spencer, this doesn’t feel like a typical Marvel event. The rules have changed, and the stakes are higher. The bad guy isn’t a bonafide villain like Ultron, Thanos or the shapeshifting Skrulls: it’s Captain America. The icon. Our unblemished hero.

    Spencer shows his knack for capturing the many characters’ essences without reducing them to caricatures. Cap shows his steely resolve, remaining Boy Scout-like even while approving pumping mind-altering drugs into the water supply. Carol Danvers’ Captain Marvel displays her bravery in the face of impossible odds. Even Tony Stark’s AI self gets into the act, appropriately sarcastic, drunken, womanizing, and even unshaven.
    Secret Empire #1 Variant
    Artist Steve McNiven has his hands full with depicting the new resistance, which includes members such as Viv Vision, Ironheart and the Hulk, battling the forces of Baron Zemo, Dr. Faustus and Arnim Zola.

    To cap off the compelling first chapter of this nine-issue series, Spencer hands us a shocking – no, really, it’s completely shocking – surprise that will leave fans divided but will compel readers to come back for more.

    Long live the Secret Empire!

    Secret Empire #1 Is Off To A Strong Start — Make Sure To Order The Remaining Issues!

    Secret Empire #1: Marvel Comics, Released May 3, 2017, Written by Nick Spencer; Pencils by Steve McNiven; Inks by Jay Leisten; Colors by Matthew Wilson; Lettering by VC’s Travis Lanham; $4.99.

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    The Venom-fueled Beast Who Broke the Bat Is Back in Bane: Conquest #1

    Bane was first drawn in the pages of Batman: The Vengeance of Bane (January 1993). Typically, DC portrays Bane as a genius with an accelerated healing factor and Venom-enhanced strength and durability. Bane’s biggest stage to date was the Batman event Knightfall, in which Bane broke Batman’s back. Over two decades later, DC Comics has finally given Bane his own miniseries, which begins with Bane: Conquest #1.

    Bane: Conquest #1 opens with a shipment of spent plutonium warheads headed toward Gotham. Bane chases down the freighter carrying the missiles and and is accompanied by his classic cronies: Trogg, Zombie, and Bird. He commandeers the vessel and swiftly dispatches the redshirts on board.

    Bane: Conquest #1

    In Bane: Conquest #1, it’s all about CONQUEST

    Based on the initial events in this first chapter (of twelve) of Bane: Conquest, Bane could almost be seen as a hero. Almost. Bane sees the incoming shipment to an unknown entity as a threat to his territory, and Gotham is his and his alone to smash. He has big plans that begin with Gotham and end in global domination.

    It’s refreshing to see Chuck Dixon and Graham Nolan teamed back up on the character they co-created back in the ’90s. Neither has lost a step. The book has a throwback feel and look from that era. The plot moves quickly, with bursts of action. Nolan updated Bane’s look without losing that retro mood.

    Bane: Conquest #1 serves as a re-introduction to a character most readers are at least conversationally familiar with. It’s a great jumping on point for new readers and a great jumping back on point for readers from the Knightfall era. Overall, it’s just a fun book to read.

    Make sure to subscribe to Bane: Conquest so you never miss an issue!

    Bane: Conquest #1, DC Comics, released May 3, 2017, rated Teen+, written by Chuck Dixon, art by Graham Nolan, colors by Gregory Wright, letters by Carlos Mangual, $3.99

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    It’s the True King of the Jungle

    It’s interesting to try and imagine what other people think, especially if that someone is famous. For example, you can’t help but wonder how George Lucas feels about the universe he created with his films or how Walt Disney felt when Disneyland opened.

    Reading Predator: Hunters #1, I wonder how Shane Black feels, knowing that he created one of the most iconic monsters in film history, and that his horrifically beautiful creatures inspire such wonderful stories like this.

    Predator Hunters #1 Cover A
    The first thing that really struck me about this comic was that, yet again, we’re introduced to a new style of Predator; one that is wholly unique to this comic, and stands out in its primitiveness. It wears armor, but the plates are tortoise shells and bone, and it wields a terrible weapon, one that is very obviously hand-hewn (and no less lethal than anything else you’ve ever seen them carry). More so than any other Predator we’ve seen yet, this one stands out as the deadliest and truest king of the jungle.

    The next thing that I noticed was that there are good guys, bad guys, bad bad guys, and good bad guys. It really speaks to the talents of the writer, Chris Warner, that, in the space of 12 pages, he wastes no words but paints a perfectly clear picture of who and what every character is. It’s like watching a puppet master at work, but you, the reader, are the marionette, and he gets you to love or hate the characters he wants you to love or hate.
    Predator Hunters #1 Cover A
    From an artistic perspective, Francisco Ruiz paints a great picture…quite literally. Not every penciler can make still pictures look like they’re in motion, and Ruiz makes the panels feel like they’re flying during the high action; however, he also keeps you drawn into the still moments with subtle changes. As your eye drifts over the page, you’ll feel camera motion and see the characters move from panel to panel and page to page at just the right pace. It’s like watching anime – full speed action at a thousand miles an hour transposed against subtle direction and camera angles.

    Of course, no art is complete without colors and inks, and the subtlety of both throughout the book only add to the depth created by the writer and penciler. Good colors make readers feel something, and throughout this book every shaft of sunlight was warm, and the depths of the jungle were fascinating.

    Whether you’re a long-time fan of the Predator universe, a fan of action comics, or just someone looking for a good read, this one is definitely worth a pickup.

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