Tag: Captain Marvel

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    I Just Saw and Loved Wonder Woman — Now What?


    Wonder Woman is a success on so many levels.

    Not only is it the first film to have a female superhero in the starring role, it’s now gone on to break the box office record for a film directed by a woman. The film also single-handedly restored viewers’ faith in the DC Cinematic Universe.

    More than that, it’s given women both young and old someone to look up to. Wonder Woman is now the cultural icon she was always meant to be. She’s more than just a hero: She is female empowerment personified and a role model.

    If you’ve left the theater wanting more action, adventure, and excitement from female superheroes, you’re not alone! However, we know that navigating the world of comics is tricky business.

    That’s why at TFAW we’ve come up with 10 wondrous comics and graphic novels that both star female superheroes and act as great jumping-on points for new readers.



    Did you find a new favorite book or want to recommend something we missed? Hit us up on Facebook, Twitter, or in the comments below!

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    Captain Marvel becomes Mighty

    NCBD Jan 18th 2017

    It’s a small week for NCBD Reviews. We’re looking at The Mighty Captain Marvel and Green Lanterns. As always These are only a small part of what came out this week. Check out our other blog articles so see our thoughts on other books. Be sure to comment or share our post on Facebook or Twitter if you like our articles!

    SPOILER ALERT — We try to keep from posting spoilers, but one may sneak through to our reviews now and again. Read with caution, true believers.

    The Mighty Captain Marvel #1
    By: Margaret Stohl, Ramon Rosanas, Elizabeth Torque

    Back with a new series after the events of Civil War II. Carol Danvers has a lot going on. Running Alpha Flight, a TV Show about her, and of course her non-superhero duties.

    Aliens from all over the galaxy are coming to earth for help. One small blue skinned Kree is getting some unwanted attention of some Army Rangers. Carol jumps into action saving the child and finding out that the ranger isn’t a ranger. They’re a galactic bounty hunter after the Kree child.

    With a Captain Marvel movie coming out in 2019, if you’re not familiar with her this was a fine jumping on point. Yes, there are mentions of past events, but learning who Carol is at her core is still there. [Martin M. at TFAW.com]

    Jump on this high flying adventure today!

    Green Lanterns #15
    By: Sam Humphries, Tom Derenick, Miguel Mendonca, Scott Hanna

    What do you do when your greatest enemy is yourself? How do master willpower when anxiety and fear haunt your every thought. This stand-alone issue focuses on our newest lantern, Jessica Cruz, as we spend a day in her life trying to manage her chronic anxiety, but still be a hero. Let me just say, it’s moving.

    Sam Humphries crafts a story that shows how anxiety really works. It’s not always the big, Earth ending things, but the little day to day things that tear away at a person’s confidence and willpower. It also goes to show that what makes a great Green Lantern isn’t being fearless, but the ability to concur your fear. Miguel Mendonca does a great job balancing the subtly of the story, along with the over the top action a series like Green Lanterns demands. I’m especially impressed that with the scenes focusing on panic attacks being more intense than the actual action.

    If you’re looking for a personal story that really gets to the core of a character, Green Lanterns #15 is it. [Mikey N. at TFAW.com]

    Join the Green Lantern Corps today!

    What did you think of these books? What should we review next week? Let us know below!

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    Luke Cage Comes to Danny Rand’s Aid

    Power Man & Iron Fist #9

    Sweet Christmas! Marvel’s new Civil War II has officially collided with the world of Power Man & Iron Fist and the fiddle-faddle hits the fan. In Power Man & Iron Fist #8, Ulysses had a vision of Luke Cage staging a prison break to bust out his best friend Danny Rand and Captain Marvel and her future-preventing crew were on their way to bust it up.

    The newest issue of Power Man & Iron Fist hits the ground running as Power Man and his cohorts take on Carol and her squad in a huge super-powered confrontation. The action flies fast but so do the jokes, writer David Walker continues to bring a light and breezy tone to this book. Even in the large battle scenes, which are awesomely rendered by artist Sanford Greene, Walker never lets things feel too heavy. The stakes are high but the action is above all fun.

    Power Man & Iron Fist has been one of the biggest bright spots of the current Marvel lineup because it’s main focus is on the friendship between Luke and Danny. It’s one of comics’ best bromances and we see Luke’s desperation to get his friend back throughout this issue. If this were anyone else he might not have put his neck on the line so much, but Power Man needs Iron Fist and vice versa. Seeing these two reunited in this issue just makes me feel good. Their banter is one of the book’s greatest strengths.

    This is of course a tie-in with the major Marvel Civil War II event, and it’s always tricky to make these not feel forced. But this issue does a great job of folding the Civil War story in naturally. It actually enhances Luke and Danny’s story instead of feeling an intrusion. It adds greater stakes to the already engrossing struggle to break Iron Fist out of prison. This book strikes a great balance of superhero action and classic buddy humor, and I can’t recommend it enough.

    SEE ALL POWER MAN AND IRON FIST COMICS
    DISCOVER HOW THE CIVIL WAR HAS IMPACTED OTHER MARVEL BOOKS

    Power Man & Iron Fist #9, Marvel Comics, rated T+, released October 12, 2016, written by David Walker, pencils and inks by Sanford Greene & Flaviano, colors by John Rauch, letters by Clayton Cowles, cover by Sanford Greene, 3.99.

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    Beyond Burnside continues, Captain Marvel is torn, we get introduced to a new western comic Kingsway West, Deadstroke goes on a mission through time, and we wipe our noses with Snotgirl.

    NCBD reviews for August 24th 2016

    Has it really been a week since our last New Comic Book Day comic book review? Man, time flies. Here are a few of this week’s new releases that stood out from the crowd. Check out our other blog articles so see our thoughts on other books. Be sure to comment or share our post on Facebook or Twitter if you like our articles!

    SPOILER ALERT — We try to keep from posting spoilers, but one may sneak through to our reviews now and again. Read with caution, true believers.

    Batgirl comics at TFAW.com

    Batgirl #2
    By: Hope Larson, Rafael Albuquerque

    Beyond Burnside continues as Batgirl tries to decode the cryptic words in the last issue from the mysterious Fruit Bat. Barbara’s path leads to train in mixed martial arts in an attempt to get over her past. As she takes a beating in the ring, things start heating up between her and Kai, which might be a little more than she, and Kai can handle. What Babs quickly discovers is that even her years of training and experience still can’t prepare her for what’s next.

    Hope Larson delivers another issue that balances the brains and determination Batgirl is known for, with the melodrama that makes her such a great character for all ages. Rafael Albuquerque’s art does a great job balancing each scene by being wide and dynamic during fights, but soft and fun during personal moments. Batgirl brilliantly separates itself nicely from the Earth-saving feats in the other Rebirth titles in exchange for a personal and relatable journey. If you’re looking for a fun story with a resourceful character, Batgirl #2 will treat you well! [Mikey N. at TFAW.com]

    Captain Marvel #8
    By: Ruth Fletcher Gage, Christos Gage, Kris Anka, Andy Owens, Matt Wilson

    Carol Danvers is torn. She wholeheartedly believes that the predictive justice movement is saving lives, but she’s being questioned (by virtually everyone) at every turn. She remains committed to the cause, but the pressure is starting to get to her and the seeds of uncertainty are starting to get to her. This issue of Captain Marvel dovetails in very well with the events that have been unfolding in the pages of Civil War II as Ruth Fletcher Gage and Christos Gage prove a strong grasp of Danvers’ motivations.

    You can really feel that we’re getting dangerously close to a boiling point (as if the events in Civil War II #3 hadn’t heated things up enough), and the events that unfold in this issue only add more uncertainty for Carol and the crew. Captain Marvel #8 has some great character moments with Captain Marvel, Black Panther, and Hawkeye. Looking forward to next issue! [Josh C. at TFAW.com]

    Kingsway West #1
    By: Greg Pak, Mirko Colak, Wil Quinta

    Greg Pak’s latest book opens with an alternate look at the United States. With the West Coast being divided mainly between Mexico and the Chinese. We’re given a bit of information in this world. Where Magic and Monsters exist alongside something called Red Gold – a mystical mineral that lives underneath the surface of the earth much like salt and gold.

    We’re introduced to our protagonist – in the same way most westerns start out – a mysterious man who is being hunted and has his hand forced into doing something he doesn’t want to do. The first issue jumps ahead several years in different spots, which isn’t a problem when setting up the environment of the story. Kingsway West #1 has the promise to be an excellent Western with magic/mystic influence. [Martin M. at TFAW.com]

    Deathstroke comics at TFAW.com

    Deathstroke #1
    By: Christopher Priest, Carlo Pagulayan

    This issue is great for old and new readers of the famous Slade Wilson aka Deathstroke. Writer Christopher Priest makes sure to bring every angle of Deathstroke’s personality through time and captivate our interest of what the heck is going on! It seems that Slade’s partner, WinterGreen is stuck in a time loop and the president’s life is in danger. This problem has Deathstroke’s name written all over it, but where is he?! With a mix of action and snarky humor, this is a great start to the new Deathstroke series. [Darcey M. at Univseral Citywalk TFAW]

    Snotgirl comics at TFAW.com

    Snotgirl #2
    By: Bryan Lee O’Malley, Leslie Hung

    Lottie is a very self-obsessive person and Bryan Lee O’Malley does and excellent job showcasing that. He writes her in a way that reads as if we are reading one of her blogs – she writes her blog exactly how she thinks.

    In this second issue, we get a little more information on what is going on in Lottie’s life, from her boyfriend status to what the heck is going on with her stalker?!

    Leslie Hung again does a fantastic job with the art of this book. I really enjoy the sense of style she brings to this series. If you are missing the humor that Bryan Lee O’Malley delivers in books like like Scott Pilgrim and Seconds, then this is a series you should be reading. It’s not all about selfish fashion bloggers, she’s got bigger problems than that. Snotgirl #2 keeps the narrative running even if you try and wipe it away.
    [Martin M. at TFAW.com]

    What did you think of these books? What should we review next week? Let us know below!

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    Things From Another World Welcomes Aaron Lopresti

    Aaron Lopresti signing at Things From Another World

    Things From Another World is excited to host a signing with Aaron Lopresti, the accomplished artist behind such titles as DC’s Wonder Woman and Marvel’s X-Men, Captain Marvel, Planet Hulk and Ms. Marvel. Be sure to visit the Beaverton TFAW store on Wednesday, May 20th from 5:00 to 8:00 p.m. to meet the artist and get your very own sketch.

    Aaron Lopresti is now bringing his artistic vision to the soon-to-be-released Convergence #7 and Convergence: Wonder Woman #2 from DC Comics. In Convergence #7, the heroes of The New 52 join the largest battle in the history of the Multiverse. While in Convergence: Wonder Woman #2, Diana Prince takes on vampire versions of The Joker and the rest of the Red Rain ghouls.

    Copies of Convergence #7, Convergence: Wonder Woman #2 and graphic novels featuring Aaron Lopresti’s art will be available for purchase at the event.

    Stop by Beaverton TFAW on May 20th from 5:00 to 8:00 p.m. to meet this amazingly talented artist in person!

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    Kelly Sue DeConnick Talks Shop with Us

    Kelly Sue DeConnickKelly Sue DeConnick is blowing up. The second issue of her new series, Captain Marvel hits stands today (it’s really, really good, BTW), and she and artist Dexter Soy have received a lot of praise for the book. We had the chance to sit down for an interview with Kelly Sue about her first writing gig, the best part of making comics, and her advice to aspiring creators.

    TFAW.com: What are your earliest memories of comics? What was the first comic you read?

    Kelly Sue DeConnick: You know, it breaks my heart that I don’t remember that. That’s a question I get a lot and I know many people can remember their first comics; I can’t. They were just always around. I grew up in large part on military bases. My father was in the Air Force and comics are a big part of (or at least were in the ’70s) base culture. Everyone read them, everyone trades them at swap meets. It’s just a thing.

    There are a few early ones that I remember particularly well. There was one — a Christian comic of some sort, I think it was Al Green — that my grandmother picked up for me at a gas station on a road trip. I remember that one particularly well because that summer with my grandmother, I didn’t have access to very many, I just had a couple comics. So I read that one over and over again, and I started taking it apart — literally cutting the panels apart, sort of rearranging things . . . I tried to copy panels as well. Although I’m not, how you say, a good artist.

    TFAW.com: What inspired you to become a writer, and when did you first begin to explore that creative outlet?

    DeConnick: Spite, probably? I have a theater degree and was trained as an actor. I have a single ugly breakup in my lifetime, and that was with a writer, and I suspect on some subconscious level I decided, “Oh yeah? I’ll show you.”

    TFAW.com: How did you break into the comics industry?

    DeConnick's first multi-issue writing gig with Steve Niles in 30 Days of Night: Eben and Stella.DeConnick: Have I broken into the comics industry? This is one of those things . . . I feel like I’ve broken in over and over again. I feel like every gig is a new “breaking in” story.

    My first work in comics was writing reviews of comics with Warren Ellis on ARTBOMB.net, and then I moved on to writing the English adaptations of Japanese and Korean comics for TokyoPop and Viz, and I did that for a number of years. And then Steve Niles gave me the opportunity to co-write 30 Days of Night: Eben & Stella with him, so that was my first multi-issue original comic.

    I got to work for Marvel as part of the “Women of Marvel” initiative of 2010.

    With the exception of anthologies, it has been entirely work-for-hire thus far. I’ll have my first creator-owned book out from Image next year. Everything is a new breaking-into-comics experience.

    TFAW.com: Last month, you launched Captain Marvel with Carol Danvers as the eponymous hero. Can you tell us a little about that experience?

    Captain Marvel #2 comes out today!DeConnick: The story of that book is really a story of the fan base for Carol Danvers, I think. That has been my good fortune. I got very lucky. I started talking to Steve Wacker at Marvel (my editor on Osborne: Evil Incarcerated) about a Ms. Marvel series back in . . . well, I opened a file for Ms. Marvel in 2010, so we’d been talking for quite some time. The timing wasn’t right for it, but Steve really championed that book — and me. He is a large part of the success of that book. We’re only one issue in, but I’ve been told our launch numbers were better than expected and the outpouring of support from the fan base is absolutely the reason for that. Really, if we had to stop now, I would feel like it was a victory — that someone else would pick up Carol’s torch for her in short order.

    TFAW.com: How has your experience been as a female creator in the comics industry?

    DeConnick: That is a really hard question for me to answer, because I couldn’t tell you what the experience has been for me as a male in the industry. (laughs) You know what I mean? I often make light of that question. It suggests that somehow I’m typing with my girl parts.

    I think that we’re all very lucky to have this job. I think it’s a very hard job to get, and a harder job to keep. I think that as an industry I would like to see us treat our female characters better and I would like to see more women professionals working steadily. I think we’re on our way.

    I don’t think it’s easy for anyone. Where I tend to get my dander up is when people suggest that women don’t want to (or shouldn’t want to) read superhero comics — or read comics at all! — or that women who want to work in the industry are statistical anomalies. People who should know better have suggested that the only reason there aren’t more women working on comics is because there aren’t very many women who *want* to work in comics. I call bullshit on that one.

    Kelly Sue resurrects Dark Horse's Ghost in a new series starting next month.TFAW.com: What’s your favorite part of telling stories in the sequential arts?

    DeConnick: When I’m done! (laughs) Again, this is a great job, and I don’t want to sound like I’m complaining, but it’s hard work. I go through a rollercoaster of insecurities during the process: “I’m terrible, I’m a hack, I’m never going to get better. I’m so slow, I’m out of time . . . ” All those things pop up. And then you make it through, and then you think, “It’s not so bad.” And you get to the point where you have to turn it in and you say, “I’ll have to do better next time.” And then someone writes you and tells you they liked your book and it made them cry and you think, “Yeah! I can’t wait to do the next one,” and it’s lather, rinse and repeat.

    TFAW.com: Your husband is also in the comic book industry. What’s that like?

    DeConnick: I’m fond of my husband, as it happens. I think I’ll keep him. As far as our being colleagues — I bounce stuff off of him all the time. They’re usually craft questions rather than story questions, because we’re interested in different stories — we tell different stories. But I could not be a bigger fan of his work. He’s so gifted, and sometimes it makes me horribly, horribly jealous. I know how hard he works, how much stress he’s under, and what level he produces at — and yet he makes it look utterly effortless.

    I just recently read a Mark Waid script, it was the first of his I’ve read. I was struck too, with him, at how effortless he makes it seem. And I envy that so much. It’s so amazing. It’s such a testament to their level of their talent and craftsmanship. I look forward to one day (laughs) getting somewhere near that.

    TFAW.com: What are three things you think comic book publishers should be doing to attract female readers?

    The manga boom is still alive and kicking. Click here to see the hottest upcoming manga at TFAW.DeConnick: I don’t think the female readership is a monolith. I have some ideas about how, as an industry, we can try to make things friendlier to new readers in general — and I do think we have a huge potential audience of new female readers. (The manga boom ought to have dispelled the myth that women won’t read comic/buy comics. They’ll do it, and they’ll pay $10 a pop!) I think that we have a tendency to dismiss not just the female readers, but new readers in general and market only to people who are already reading comics, and I think that when we do that, it’s not really self-sustaining. We’re leaving money on the table. One thing I think helps is more obvious jumping-on points.

    TFAW.com: What aspect of comics have you struggled with, as a creator?

    DeConnick: The schedule. I think that is the bane of my existence right now. Because we’re a serial format — the train leaves the station every thirty days. The way things tend to get up and running, the turn-around time is breakneck.

    Neil Gaiman said something recently about when he’s writing a book, he starts with the first word and puts one after another until he gets to the end of the story, and that’s the first draft. Then he goes back and reworks it so it looks like he knew what he was doing the whole time. That’s the same idea as one of my favorite E.L. Doctorow quotes (and I’m paraphrasing here):

    Writing is like driving a car at night. You can only see as far as the headlights, but you can make a whole trip that way.

    That’s a much more natural process for me — to just kind of dive in and write and see where I end up. Then go back and say, “Oh, if I’m going to need this gun in the third act, I need to make sure it’s there in the first act.” But because of the way that the comic book industry works, you don’t get that much time, and you need to be able to write from an outline and structure it from the beginning. Ideally, I’d be able to write a whole story out, figure it out as I go, and then go back and rework it before any issues ever came out. But that’s just not possible in serial fiction.

    TFAW.com: What advice can you give aspiring comic book creators?

    DeConnick: Work hard. Make comics. This absolutely attainable. If this is the thing that you want to do, you can absolutely do this. It is not easy, but nothing worthwhile is. Don’t be a jerk to your editors — that’s always a good idea. Work hard, care about what you’re making.

    TFAW.com: Who’s work had an influence in your writing?

    Kelly Sue and Brian Michael Bendis collaborate on the critically acclaimed Castle graphic novels.DeConnick: Brian Bendis — for his dialogue, in particular. It’s just some of the best in the industry. He’s also not afraid to write very vulnerable books, if that makes sense to anyone. Warren Ellis is just a master in every sense of the word. He understands this craft better on his worst day than I ever will. He’s also hilarious. I think that’s the great secret about him — that he’s a comedy writer. He makes me think while he’s making me laugh.

    TFAW.com: Who’s one woman in comics that you admire?

    DeConnick: I couldn’t narrow it down to one. Diana Schutz would be huge for me — the stories that woman can tell . . . Gail Simone. I just admire Gail as a human and as a comic creator. I adore Jen Van Meeter. Jen Van Meter, Kathryn Immonen, and Marjorie Liu are all three women who have a certain grace to them that I will never possess, and I admire greatly. Kathryn is elegant on every level. Jen manages to be both fiery and gentle at the same time. She’s one of the most nurturing people I’ve ever met in my life. My shoulders fall three inches whenever I’m in her presence. Marjorie Liu is just classy, I don’t think she and I are the same species. I feel like the mushroom toad girl next to her. She handles all of this with such grace.

    TFAW.com: What was the last comic you read?

    DeConnick: Jason Aaron’s Incredible Hulk.

    Captain Marvel #6 now available for pre-order at TFAW.com!TFAW.com: What projects do you have coming up soon?

    DeConnick: I have Ghost from Dark Horse right now with Phil Noto. His work always solicits gasps — he’s amazing. Obviously Captain Marvel with Dexter Soy. He’s astonishingly talented, very epic work. I have a creator-owned book called Pretty Deadly coming out next year from Image with Emma Rios, who was my collaborator on Osborn. I love her work. Castle: Storm Season just went out to the printer, so that should be out soon too — that one is with Ema Lupacchino, who is killer.

    —————–

    We want to thank Kelly Sue for taking the time out of her busy schedule to chat comics with us, it was a great time. Very cool to hear about her first creator-owned book. You can bet that Pretty Deadly will be on our reading list.

    SEE OTHER WORK BY KELLY SUE DeCONNICK AT TFAW

    Did you pick up Captain Marvel #1? Did you love how fun the issue was? What did you think of the first Castle graphic novel? Let us know below.

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    Carol Danvers Stars as Captain Marvel in New Series This July

    Captain Marvel #1 at TFAW.comMs. Marvel has a distinguished career–she’s served as a solo hero and is a long-time member of the Avengers. This July, Carol Danvers leaves the Ms. Marvel identity behind and becomes the eponymous protagonist of the new Captain Marvel series by Kelly Sue DeConnick (Castle: Deadly Storm, Osborn) and artist Dexter Soy (Army of Two).

    She’s back! The “Mightiest” of Earth’s Mightiest Heroes! Ace pilot. Legendary Avenger. 100% pure bad-a$$. Carol Danvers has a new name, a new mission . . . and all the power she needs to make her life a living hell.

    “I want this to be a book about optimism, about exceeding even our own expectations, about the power of possibility and the seeming magic of flight. C’mon now, people: prove me wrong. Show me that a female-led book about the power of the human spirit [and] the many guises of heroism . . . can break six issues, won’t you?”

    -Kelly Sue DeConnick on Captain Marvel

    ORDER CAPTAIN MARVEL #1 TODAY

    Are you a Carol Danvers fan? Been looking forward to a female-led book by a female creator since X-23 disappeared from the shelves? What do you think about Kelly Sue’s new Captain Marvel series? Let us know below.

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