Tag: rachelle rosenberg

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    Nick Fury Is Back — No Not That Nick Fury

    This week, for New Comic Book Day, we’re bringing you the rebirth of Lana Lang, a brand new spy thriller, and the start of a bizarre adventure. As always, this is only a small batch of the many great comics that came out this week.

    Check out our other blog articles so see our thoughts on other books. Be sure to comment or share our post on Facebook or Twitter if you like our articles!

    SPOILER ALERT — We try to keep from posting spoilers, but one may sneak through to our reviews now and again. Read with caution, true believers.

    Superman #9
    By: Kate Perkins, Stephen Segovia, Billy Tan

    Superwoman #9 presents a turning point for both the comic and Lana Lang as a whole. Superwoman #9 is a tie-in to the brand new Superman: Reborn – Aftermath event.

    The book revolves around Lana Lang coping with the loss of her powers. When she is at her lowest, her childhood friend Superman is there to give her a pep talk. It’s heartwarming in that classic Superman sort of way.

    Kate Perkins takes over the writing duties in Superwoman #9. She has no problem capturing the voice of the characters, especially Lana and Clark. Stephen Segovia, as usual, kills it on art duties.

    Superwoman #9 is a great time to jump into the book if you’ve yet to check out this series. The comic brings readers up to speed while planting the seeds for some future plots. These plots not only involve Lana Lang but also Superman. [Josh P at TFAW.com]

    CHECK OUT SUPERWOMAN FROM THE BEGINNING

    Nick Fury #1
    By: James Robinson, Aco, Huge Petrus, Rachelle Rosenberg

    James Robinson wrote a perfect psycidellic love letter to Jim Strinko’s run on Nick Fury – Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. in the 70’s. This color popping spy thriller is what a Nick Fury comic should be. Ever since the First Look preview first hit, I’ve been waiting for the final comic. I was not dissapointed.

    ACO, Huge Petrus and Rachelle Rosenberg come together to create a beautiful comic. The art screams late 60’s spy thriller, and I loved every panel. The gorgeous panel layouts reminded me of the fantastic J.H. Williams III’s Batwoman – Elegy series. While I had issues following one double-spread panel, on the whole the action was easy to follow.

    If you’re looking for a solid series that is unaffected by the rest of the ever-changing rosters in the Marvel Universe, this comic is it. Nick Fury #1 is my top pick for this week’s new comics and is one book you should pick up. [Martin M at TFAW.com]

    SUBSCRIBE AND NEVER MISS AN ISSUE

    Plastic #1
    By: Doug Wagner, Daniel Hillyard, Andrew Robinson

    One of the taglines that Image Comics is using to promote the new Plastic series is a quote by Robert Kirkman, the author behind The Walking Dead, which states “This is the weirdest @%#* I’ve ever read. I love it!” After reading Plastic #1, I can safely say that Mr. Kirkman was 100 percent right in his assessment.

    There is no backstory to Plastic #1. The comic doesn’t ease you into the weirdness of its story – it dumps you right in and either you sink or you swim. However, because it’s weird doesn’t mean it’s bad. Writer Doug Wagner presents an engaging tale with some unexpected twists and turns. We’re going to keep this review brief on purpose, as the best thing you can do with Plastic #1 is go in blind. Trust us when we say you’ll want to experience the story with a fresh set of eyes.

    This comic isn’t going to be for everyone, but everyone should give at least the first issue a try. This is one of those comics that you need to experience for yourself before making any sort of judgment call on it. Definitely, give it a shot and go in with an open mind, and you may just find your new favorite series. [Josh P. at TFAW.com]

    FIND ALL THE NEW IMAGE COMICS SERIES

    What did you think of these books? What should we review next week? Let us know below!

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    Cap’s New Past as a Hydra Double Agent Continues

    Steve Rogers shocked the world back in Captain America: Steve Rogers #1, May 2016. While hurling his friend and ally to his presumed death, he uttered two words that nobody ever believed would come out of Captain America’s mouth. “Hail Hydra.”

    It has since been revealed that Red Skull used Kobik to turn Roger’s memory inside out. In his new recollection of events, Cap remembers learning Hydra’s ideals as a child in a special school. He also remembers befriending a young Helmut Zemo.

    Captain America Steve Rogers
    Captain America Steve Rogers

    In his head, Rogers returned to the United States and then became the first Super Soldier. It was perfect cover for Hydra’s ultimate spy.

    Baron Zemo Steals The Show

    Captain America: Steve Rogers #13 spends most of the chapter developing Baron Zemo’s character. In the buildup to Secret Empire, Nick Spencer delivers a fuller picture of just how highly Cap regards his friendship with Baron Zemo. Rogers will go so far as to stand between Bucky and Zemo in the middle of a firefight to keep them both alive.

    The flashback sequence teases a bigger conflict between Barnes and Zemo in the upcoming Secret Empire. A forced decision with mortal consequences between his two best friends could be the trigger that snaps Cap out of the fugue he’s been living in. We can hope, anyway.

    While this chapter is heavy on exposition, there are a few dynamic action scenes. The artwork is fantastic throughout. Baron Zemo’s arrogant indifference is telegraphed brilliantly, despite being a masked character.

    It’s hard to tell where the pencils of Ro Stein leave off and Ted Brandt’s begin. There is one sequence in particular that has four pages, sixteen panels, and zero dialogue. The artwork tells the entire story, and the reader has no difficulty following along.

    PRE-ORDER CAPTAIN AMERICA STEVE ROGERS #14 AND FIND OUT WHO’S BEEN PULLING ALL THE STRINGS

    Captain America Steve Rogers #13, Marvel Comics, Released March 8, 2017, Written by Nick Spencer, Art by Ro Stein and Ted Brandt, Color by Rachelle Rosenberg, Letters by VC’s Joe Caramagna, Cover by Arthur Adams and Jason Keith, $3.99

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    R.L. Stine Brings His Special Brand of Horror to Man-Thing

    Young biochemist Ted Sallis was working in the Everglades as part of a secret team, known as Project: Gladiator. The team’s mission was to recreate the Super-Soldier Serum that gave Captain America Steve Rogers his abilities.

    Dr. Sallis breached protocol on the site by allowing his lover, Ellen Brandt, to accompany him in the lab. When Sallis discovered his girlfriend was a double agent who had sold him out, he destroyed his written notes. He had the formula memorized, but there was only one existing vial of completed serum.

    Man-Thing #2
    Pre-Order Man-Thing #2

    Fleeing with the vial of serum, Dr. Sallis was ambushed by Brandt and a couple thugs. In a desperate attempt to save his own life, Sallis injected himself with the serum. Unfortunately, before the serum took effect, he crashed his car into the swamp.

    Bursting from the car and rising from the soupy muck, he emerged as Man-Thing.

    Man-Thing is a creature composed of plant matter and has superhuman strength and stamina. It is able to sense human emotion and interact with humans, but lacks human sentience.

    R.L. Stine (Goosebumps, Fear Street) uses Man-Thing #1 to expand on a concept that was first touched on in What If? #26 (April 1981). What if the Man-Thing had regained Ted Sallis’ brain?

    Man-Thing’s Past Comes Back To Haunt Him

    The five-part miniseries opens on a movie set where Man-Thing is starring in a science fiction action film. The Man-Monster has recovered his ability to speak and has the intelligence and memory of Dr. Sallis.

    When he’s fired from the set of the movie, sentient Man-Thing struggles (literally) against his animal self. He has to decide whether to return to the swamp or try to make things work in the city. Unfortunately, it’s not easy for a ten-foot tall vegetable with superhuman strength and a Ph.D. to fit in.

    FOUND OUT WHY THE MUCK HAS RUN AMOK AND PRE-ORDER MAN-THING #2 AND MAN-THING #3

    Man-Thing #1, Marvel Comics, Release Date March 08, 2017, Written by R.L. Stine, Art by German Peralta, Color by Rachelle Rosenberg, Letters by VC’s Travis Lanham, $3.99

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    Elektra Hunts Phil Coulson in Agents of SHIELD #9

    Agents of SHIELD #9 at TFAW.com

    Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. TV show started back up this week and it was great to catch up with the gang. The thing is, they never went away. Imagine a world where there was no summer hiatus and no months of anxiously waiting for your favorite S.H.I.E.L.D. Agents to come back. Agents of SHIELD #9 is a testament that these characters never truly went away.

    At this particular moment in time, the team is embroiled in Marvel’s Civil War II, which sees longtime teammates on opposite sides of a moral dilemma. You don’t need to concern yourself with the details if you haven’t been following along because this issue is just plain fun. Newbies are welcome.

    Agents of SHIELD #9 at TFAW.com

    Enough with the background. Marc Guggenheim wastes no time picking up where the previous issue left off. Fitz finds himself on the wrong end of Elektra’s sai and things look pretty bad. You’d think that she’s the villain, but you’d be wrong. Elektra is (once again) a member of S.H.I.E.L.D., and she’s taken over for Phil Coulson. Ward is back, Daisy is on the outs with the team, Coulson is being hunted by S.H.I.E.L.D. Director Maria Hill, Simmons is in a struggle for her life — things are upside down, and I love it.

    If you’re a fan of the television show and you’re not reading this series…you’re missing out, bub. The Agents of SHIELD comic book series is unencumbered by a television budget or film rights to certain Marvel characters — we get a ton of action in each issue, which makes this series well worth the price of admission.

    Leaving off, it must be said that whoever put series artist Ario Anindito and color artist Rachelle Rosenberg together should be promoted. They’re a great team who’ve given us one hell of a comic. Order your copy of Agents of SHIELD #9 today!

    SEE AGENTS OF SHIELD COMICS & GRAPHIC NOVELS

    Editor’s Note: Grant Ward is the worst. Even though I despise him for the whole Hydra thing, I find myself hooked by his role in this issue (no spoilers here, folks) and am interested in seeing how things play out in future issues. Great job Guggenheim!

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    Review: Mockingbird #5

    Review of Mockingbird #5

    Mockingbird #5Mockingbird is a series that seems to have it all. A butt-kicking, intelligent, funny heroine. Light plotlines with a hint of something more menacing to come. Guest stars aplenty. And now with issue 5, zombies!

    Bobbi Morse’s Mockingbird spends much of this issue battling the undead while trying to escape a secret S.H.I.E.L.D. medical clinic located stories beneath New York’s Chelsea Market. In the process, she runs into the likes of Spider-Man (the Miles Morales version) and Howard the Duck. (The eagle-eyed reader may also spot artist Ibrahim Moustafa’s Hulk-on-a-toilet in-joke.)

    As usual, Mockingbird doesn’t need to wait for a male hero to rescue her. From nearly the first panel, she’s taking matters into her own hands by taking out zombies while trying to understand the mysterious illness that may be threatening her life. In fact, it’s the fighting that takes Morse’s mind off of the rest of her troubled life and gives her something to focus on. She admits that the fighting makes her happy.

    As usual in this series, humor abounds. Writer Chelsea Cain keeps Mockingbird light, cracking more quips in a few pages than are usually crammed into an entire issue of Spider-Man (Parker, not Morales). But the surprising humor comes from studying Moustafa’s artwork. Although it’s a departure from the previous penciler Kate Niemozyk, it’s filled with jokes, from the awful flowered wallpaper in the doctor’s offices to the almost unnoticeable “Stressed out?” sign with a picture of the Hulk.

    The issue ends with somewhat of a resolution to Morse’s ongoing illness – though it’s probably not what you were thinking. The good news is that she will be back for more happy fighting.

    Mockingbird #5, Marvel Comics, Released July 27, 2016, Written by Chelsea Cain, Art by Ibrahim Moustafa, Color by Rachelle Rosenberg, Lettering by VC’s Joe Caramagna; $3.99.

    Review by Tom Smithyman.

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    Review: Captain America: Steve Rogers #3

    Review of Captain America - Steve Rogers #3

    Captain America #3The Captain America: Steve Rogers title had made a lot of news lately with the seemingly impossible revelation that Cap has been a sleeper agent for the evil Hydra organization. Having learned the reason for this improbable transition previously – that ended with Cap pushing an ally out of a plane while declaring, “Hail Hydra” – this issue picks up with the Captain reporting in to Red Skull, the founder of the evil empire.

    Cap goes so far as to draw a multi-armed hydra on his ripped chest and kneels before the crimson baddie to show his dedication. It’s disturbing for this symbol of America to bow before what’s essentially a Nazi, and to have him taking order from his arch enemy.

    The artwork from Jesus Saiz is straightforward and doesn’t distract with extraneous details. But its colorist Rachelle Rosenberg who brings the issue to life. When we flash back to young Steve and his mother being indoctrinated into Hydra in the 1930s, we’re haunted by a shade of red. From a red sky to a crimson scarf to blood-red water, the specter of the Red Skull constantly casts a shadow across the family’s history.

    It’s a remarkable storyline that writer Nick Spencer is taking us
    through. Cap has been through a lot over the years (suspended hibernation, the death of multiple colleagues, rapid aging, his own death) but never has he had to fight the evil within himself.

    That’s a fight worth watching.

    Captain America: Steve Rogers #3, Marvel Comics, Released July 27, 2016, Written by Nick Spencer, Art by Jesus Saiz, Color by Rachelle Rosenberg, Lettering by VC’s Joe Caramagna; $3.99.

    Review by Tom Smithyman

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    Review: Mockingbird #4

    mockingbird #4 coverReunited – and it feels so good. Well, mostly good. For a while anyway.

    That’s the sentiment in the newest issue of Mockingbird, which reteams the troubled SHIELD agent with her one-time husband, Clint Barton, aka Hawkeye. As Bobbi Morse’s Mockingbird is researching the mysterious illness that is threatening her life, she comes across a not-so-secret underwater base teaming with evil scientist-terrorists. As well as a certain bow-wielding Avenger.

    They are reminded why they were such a good team – and ultimately why they split. Writer Chelsea Cain nails the dynamic between the lovers. It’s never too serious, but you always know they care about each other. She even sprinkles in a little backstory to humorously help move the pair out of a sticky situation.

    Cain also adds plenty of lightheartedness to the series. Instead of SHIELD’s usual menace, Advanced Idea Mechanics (AIM), Mockingbird and Hawkeye battle Total Idea Mechanics (TIM). “So basically you’re AIM but in a different color suit,” says Mockingbird, who apparently is in on the joke.

    What’s also refreshing about the series is that this character, despite having no super powers, can hold her own with the big boys (emphasis on boys). She rescues the gentleman in distress, not the other way around. She’s the one cracking jokes while beating up the baddies and as a scientist, she’s not waiting for some deus ex machina for a cure. She’s doing the research herself. There’s little doubt, when her life is saved in a future issue, she’ll only have herself to blame.

    Mockingbird #4, Marvel Comics, Released June 29, 2016, Written by Chelsea Cain, Art by Kate Niemozyk, Color by Rachelle Rosenberg, Lettering by VC’s Joe Caramagna; $3.99.

    Review by Tom Smithyman

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