Tag: Young Animal

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    Go for the Gold with X-Men

    Coming in the first week of April for NCBD. We have X-Men Gold, Sovereigns and Shade #7. Check out our other blog articles so see our thoughts on other books. Be sure to comment or share our post on Facebook or Twitter if you like our articles!

    SPOILER ALERT — We try to keep from posting spoilers, but one may sneak through to our reviews now and again. Read with caution, true believers.

    Sovereigns #0
    By: Ray Fawkes, Johnny Desjardins, Stephen Segovia, Mohan, Kyle Higgins, Jorge Fornes, Chris O’Halloran, Chuck Wendig, Alvaro Sarraseca, Triona Farrell, Aubrey Sitterson, Dylan Burnett

    The End of the Golden Age. Sovereigns #0 kick off a new era for the Dynamite heroes. The comic starts off hinting at the end and slowly moves backwards to give us small bits of what’s to come in the series. Not only are we shown what Sovereigns will bring but what the other Dynamite series, like Mangus and Turok, will also bring.

    Sovereigns #0 is split into several sections and timelines, each one giving us a taste of what’s happened and what’s coming next.

    Sovereigns writer Ray Fawkes, along with artist Johnny Desjardins and colorist Mohan, does a great job with the set-up in the first section. Everything looks peaceful and calm until you flip the page and see the truth. [Martin M. at TFAW.com]

    At a Dollar for This Introduction You Can’t Go Wrong!

    X-Men Gold #1
    By: Marc Guggenheim, Ardian Syaf

    After the success of X-Men Prime #1, a great deal of pressure falls on writer Marc Guggenheim to keep the ball rolling with this brand. I’m proud to say he does just that and then some.

    The story in X-Men Gold #1 opens not with large amounts of exposition but with a bang, putting us directly into a fight between the X-Men and Terrax, of all people. By the second page, the book gives us almost everything the X-Men are known for, including teamwork and humor. By the end of the book, everything else the X-Men is missing is now there: prejudice, romance, softball games, and the surprise return of a group of villains that takes the X-Men back to their roots.

    X-Men Gold #1 is a home run and is such a callback to the days of Claremont that you’d almost expect his name on the cover. [Josh P. at TFAW.com]

    CATCH UP ON ALL OF RESSURXION

    Shade: The Changing Girl #7
    By: Cecil Castellucci, Marguerite Sauvage, Becky Cloonan

    Billed as a stand-alone story, Shade: The Changing Girl #7 is a great jumping on point for anyone who has wanted to see what this book is all about. Fair warning: As part of the Young Animal line of comics, this is a book that is intended for mature readers only.

    The story that writer Cecil Castellucii tells is a sad one, and while it involves aliens and other interplanetary forces, the core of the story will resonate with anyone. The story touches on issues such as struggling to fit into society and feeling like an outsider even among friends. It’s a powerful issue with an ending that will truly make you feel for the main character. The art by Marguerite Sauvage is breathtaking and brings the story to life.

    If you’ve yet to check out Shade: The Changing Girl #7, this is the perfect issue to jump right in. The story is well-written, the art is fantastic and it’s story unlike anything else DC is currently putting out. [Josh P. at TFAW.com]

    Be Sure to Pre-Order Shade: The Changing Girl Vol 1!

    What did you think of these books? What should we review next week? Let us know below!

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    Panic on The Streets of Gotham

    There’s a new vigilante in Gotham City and she has a whole different vibe than anyone in the Bat Family.

    In the opening pages of Mother Panic #1, Gotham socialite Violet Paige returns home from an undisclosed medical incident that lead to extensive surgery. It’s a very familiar story of a child of privilege returning to Gotham to fight for justice. But Violet is no Bruce Wayne.

    This story feels modern. Violet is the talk of the tabloids and entertainment reporters. Writer Jody Houser taps into our cultural obsession with the rich and poorly behaved. Immediately, it’s obvious that Violet has a problem with alcohol and her attitude is less than polite. This doesn’t feel like your classic masked vigilante story.

    A New Spin on Gotham

    Mother Panic is the newest title from DC’s most recent imprint Young Animal. It’s also the first of the Young Animal books to focus on a new character. So far, the Young Animal titles have taken place in their own weird and dark world outside the DC universe.

    Mother Panic jumps us into the very familiar world of Gotham City, but manages to put its own spin on it. The intriguing and engrossing first issue, pulls readers into the world of the story, but leaves plenty of mystery. There is a sense of Violet, her vigilante persona of Mother Panic, and a little bit of the threat facing Gotham. However, plenty is still left up in the air to fill up future issues. Much more light remains to be shined on this shadowy corner of Gotham City.

    PRE-ORDER THE NEXT ISSUES IN THE MOTHER PANIC SERIES.

    Mother Panic #1, DC Comics, November 9, 2016, Ages 12+, Written by Jody Houser, Art by Tommy Lee Edwards, $3.99

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    Larry Trainor’s Identity Revealed

    So many questions. Where is Larry Trainor? Who is Larry Trainor? What is Larry Trainor? And WHERE is Larry Trainor?

    Doom Patrol #2 opens with a scene that re-introduces us to test pilot Larry Trainor, classic Doom Patrol’s Negative Man. In a bizarre sequence that reveals Trainor’s co-pilot to be a matryoshka nesting doll, we take a smash cut to a corner stand selling the dolls, where Trainor proceeds to start a fight with two strangely dressed passersby.

    Doom Patrol comics at TFAW.comAnother smash cut takes us to a sparsely furnished apartment, where we get another look at EMT Casey Brinke. After Brink’s bizarre day in the first of the series, Doom Patrol #1, Casey wakes to find that her roommate has completely re-assembled Robotman while she slept. Casey’s partner arrives in their EMS rig downstairs, and before Casey can process much of what’s going on, she has to leave for work. Their first patient of the day turns out to be some nut who has gone ballistic on a matryoshka stand and is lying on the pavement, screaming.

    Gerard Way’s writing style brings a unique twist to these classic characters, while the new players are strange and interesting. There are plenty of callbacks to previous incarnations of this series, but not so many that a new reader would be completely lost. While I highly recommend that you pick up a copy of Doom Patrol #1, this issue stands on its own sardonic, twisted legs.

    Doom Patrol #2 Variant Cover Edtion at TFAW.com
    Doom Patrol #2 Variant Cover Will Sell Out Soon!
    Nick Derington’s artwork and Tamra Bonvillain’s color choices make this series an absolute pleasure to look at. Their collaborative choices make this series just cartoony enough to be fun, while allowing for the seriousness of some of the content.

    Doom Patrol is just one of the titles being released under the Young Animal imprint from DC Comics. If you’re looking for a new series for your pull list that stray from the beaten path, Doom Patrol will certainly fit the bill. Be sure to also check out Shade the Changing Girl, Cave Carson has a Cybernetic Eye, and Mother Panic.

    SEE ALL DOOM PATROL COMICS
    SEE OTHER BOOKS FROM DC’S YOUNG ANIMAL IMPRINT

    Doom Patrol #2, published by Young Animal, rated Mature, released October 12, 2016, written by Gerard Way, art and cover by Nick Derington, variant cover by Mike and Laura Allred, colors by Tamra Bonvillain, letters by Todd Klein, $3.19

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