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    Captain America’s lies continue

    NCBD 2/22/17

    This week’s NCBD reviews include Greg Rucka’s new series, Captain America’s lies, and Serenity. As always theses are only a few books that came out this week. Check out our other blog articles so see our thoughts on other books. Be sure to comment or share our post on Facebook or Twitter if you like our articles!

    SPOILER ALERT — We try to keep from posting spoilers, but one may sneak through to our reviews now and again. Read with caution, true believers.

    Captain America Steve Rogers #12
    By: Nick Spencer, Jesus Saiz, Javier Pina, Paul Renaud

    Man, do I need to go back and re-read these past 12 issues. THere is a lot coming out of this. Like the cover says Taskmaster knows Steve’s secret, and he wants to cash in with S.H.I.E.L.D.

    This series has been pretty controversial, and it’s easy to see why. But man, is it a compelling story. If you haven’t been reading Nick Spenser’s Captain America: Steve Rogers because of that HUGE drop in the first issue, I can tell you that this will be a story arc told for ages!

    My favorite part of this issue was reading Steve’s memories during WWII. It really puts a spin on what we’ve known and what he believes happened. [Martin M. at TFAW.com]

    GET CAUGHT UP ON CAPTAIN AMERICA: STEVE ROGERS

    The Old Guard #1
    By: Greg Rucka, Leandro Ferndez

    A brand new series of Greg Rucka, The Old Guard tells the tale of a small team of men and women who cannot die. Set in our time they seem to be coping in their own way. In this issue, our protagonist is Andy, a hard-headed leader who ok’s a mission to save school girls who were kidnapped. Of course, this is issue 1, and things are never so simple.

    In a world of technology, it will be hard for Andy and her team to keep their secret hidden.

    Greg Rucka again pulls out all the stops for this new series. He proves again why he is on my top 5 writers list. In this short time with these characters, I’ve already grown attached to them and can’t wait to see where this goes.

    Leandro Frenández does a fantastic design job with fading panels to emanate lighting, and even how Andy’s axe is stored, it’s the only panel but it looks so cool. Daniela Miwa’s colors fit it so well. Do yourself a favor and don’t miss this series! [Martin M. at TFAW.com]

    CHECK OUT GREG RUCKA’S OTHER SERIES LAZARUS FOR ANOTHER STRONG READ

    Serenity: No Power in the ‘Verse #5
    By: Chris Roberson, Georges Jeanty, Karl Story, Wes Dzioba, Dan Dos Santos

    River and Iris are being held captive by Operative Kalista, who is ready to turn them back into Agents of the Alliance. This reader doesn’t reckon that Mal will take to kindly to losing these girls once again to who knows where. I’m sure Mal has a plan, it ain’t likely to be a good one but it will likely get the job done – messy like. Check out Issue #5 of No Power in the ‘Verse. [Angela G. at TFAW.com]

    GET ALL YOUR FIREFLY NEEDS HERE

    What did you think of these books? What should we review next week? Let us know below!

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    Batman and TMNT Join Forces

    New Comic Book Day Nov 9 2016

    It’s Wednesday, and that means there are new comic book releases to talk about! Check out our other New Comic Book Day blog articles to see our thoughts on previous new releases. Be sure to comment or share our post on Facebook or Twitter if you like our articles!

    SPOILER ALERT — We try to keep from posting spoilers, but one may sneak through to our reviews now and again. Read with caution, true believers.

    Batman Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Adventures #1
    By: Matthew K. Manning, Jon Sommariva

    Combining my favorite iteration of Batman with the most fun version of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Batman/Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Adventures gives us the ’90s Batman Animated Series combined with the current Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles animated series. What we get is a great sense of nostalgia, combined with the upbeat sensibilities the Turtles are known for. So basically, a good time.

    Matthew K. Manning weaves a plot that sets our two worlds of heroes onto the same case in a way that respects Batman’s detective skills and the turtle’s penchant for always getting themselves into trouble. Jon Sommariva’s art does a great job of combining the very distinctive art styles from both worlds into one that makes it feel like they belong together. Where IDW and DC had these two comic book versions of the characters recently crossover, having the light-hearted and more commercially known versions of these two classic franchises join forces is a great breath of fresh air for the kid at heart. [Mikey N. at TFAW.com]

    PICK UP THE COMIC INSPIRED BY YOUR TOY BATTLES
    VISIT OUR SPECIAL BATMAN PAGE
    VISIT OUR SPECIAL TMNT PAGE

    Flash #10
    By: Joshua Williamson, Felipe Watanabe, Oclair Albert, Chris Sotomayor, Steve Wands, Carmine Di Giandomencio

    Heroics are hard. Having fantastic powers is great, but it doesn’t make one a hero. Barry Allen has been training Wally West how to use his powers, but The Flash #7 shows us that there’s more to heroics than simply running fast.

    Over the decades, The Flash has learned valuable lessons on how to save the people of Central City; he’s now using those years of experience and imparting wisdom upon Kid Flash. It’s as if Joshua Williamson is distilling decades worth of comics into digestible pieces for a new generation of comics fans.

    Williamson introduces two new Rogues, and this story promises to take us to places we’ve never gone before. I am excited to keep reading. [Josh C. at TFAW.com]

    PICK UP THIS ISSUE OF THE FLASH & DISCOVER OTHER GREAT FLASH BOOKS

    Archer & Armstrong #9
    By: Rafer Roberts, Mike Norton, Brian Level

    A&A #9 serves as a jump on point for new readers. “Andromeda Estranged” kicks off a new arc that sets our heroes in a history lesson. You see, Earth and humans, they’re a strange anomaly within the universe. The “creators,” as we learn, didn’t mean for us to be created. They tried to steer us in the right direction but greed and power (as it always seems to) corrupted us.

    Valiant is known for creating good jumping-on points for new readers and this issue is no exception. Rafer Roberts has been doing an excellent job with this series. Issue #9 is no exception. Penciler Mike Norton and Colorist Allen Passalaqua within the first few pages have a visually striking style that works with the context, (thanks to Ryan Lee) a James Stokoe grit if you will. Once we’re back in our world, however, they go to a more familiar style that Archer & Armstrong fans are used to. [Martin M. at TFAW.com]

    GRAB THIS BUDDY COP COMEDY FROM VALIANT ENTERTAINMENT!

    WWE Then Now Forever #1
    By: Dennis Hopeless, Dan Mora, Ross Thibodeaux, Rob Guillory, Rob Shamberger, Derek Fridolfs, Daniel Bayliss

    As a fan of professional wrestling growing up, I couldn’t wait to get my hands on this issue from BOOM! Studios new WWE series. WWE: Then. Now. Forever #1. This is a reader’s first introduction to the new comic world that weaves in and out of actual stories from the WWE. This compilation issue collects a story by Dennis Hopeless about Seth Rollins’ rise and fall with his team, The Shield. Along with short stories featuring The New Day, Sasha Banks, and Tugboat. This issue also collects the San Diego Comic Con exclusive one-page stories featuring Stone Cold Steve Austin, The Rock, Triple H, John Cena, The New Day, Sasha Banks, The Undertaker, and Dusty Rhodes.

    Headed up by a huge list of creators, this book takes the fandom seriously in some stories, has a whole lot of fun in others, and finds itself incredibly inspirational. The heroes, the heels, the over the top performances, and the drama that fans of professional wrestling have come to love and crave are all found here. If you’ve ever been a fan of any era of the WWE, WWE: Then. Now. Forever is a book for you. [Mikey N. at TFAW.com]

    DON’T TAP OUT GRAB WWE: THEN. NOW. FOREVER TODAY!

    Captain America Steve Rogers #7
    By: Nick Spencer, Jesus Saiz, Joe Caramagna, Stephanie Hans

    Steve Rogers’ reality has been secretly rewritten by a sentient Cosmic Cube known as Kobik. He is now an agent of HYDRA.

    That’s all the background you need to jump aboard Nick Spencer and Jesus Saiz’s Steve Rogers Captain America. Cap is no longer the bastion of freedom and morality; he’s been corrupted, and this allows Spencer to explore some important themes that his predecessors never have. Steve Rogers Captain America #7 is the start to a new arc, so now’s a good time to join along.

    Saiz’s art is expressive and emotional, particularly when it comes to depicting the book’s tyrants–the Red Skull and the bullies of 1935 that were a part of the machine that gave rise to his HYDRA regime.

    I can’t help but have optimism about the future of this comic and really, really look forward to getting our Steve Rogers back in the saddle again. [Josh C. at TFAW.com]

    VISIT OUR CAPTAIN AMERICA PAGE

    What did you think of these books? What should we review next week? Let us know below!

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    Review: Captain America: Steve Rogers #3

    Review of Captain America - Steve Rogers #3

    Captain America #3The Captain America: Steve Rogers title had made a lot of news lately with the seemingly impossible revelation that Cap has been a sleeper agent for the evil Hydra organization. Having learned the reason for this improbable transition previously – that ended with Cap pushing an ally out of a plane while declaring, “Hail Hydra” – this issue picks up with the Captain reporting in to Red Skull, the founder of the evil empire.

    Cap goes so far as to draw a multi-armed hydra on his ripped chest and kneels before the crimson baddie to show his dedication. It’s disturbing for this symbol of America to bow before what’s essentially a Nazi, and to have him taking order from his arch enemy.

    The artwork from Jesus Saiz is straightforward and doesn’t distract with extraneous details. But its colorist Rachelle Rosenberg who brings the issue to life. When we flash back to young Steve and his mother being indoctrinated into Hydra in the 1930s, we’re haunted by a shade of red. From a red sky to a crimson scarf to blood-red water, the specter of the Red Skull constantly casts a shadow across the family’s history.

    It’s a remarkable storyline that writer Nick Spencer is taking us
    through. Cap has been through a lot over the years (suspended hibernation, the death of multiple colleagues, rapid aging, his own death) but never has he had to fight the evil within himself.

    That’s a fight worth watching.

    Captain America: Steve Rogers #3, Marvel Comics, Released July 27, 2016, Written by Nick Spencer, Art by Jesus Saiz, Color by Rachelle Rosenberg, Lettering by VC’s Joe Caramagna; $3.99.

    Review by Tom Smithyman

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    Free Comic Book Day – Review of Captain America

    free comic book day - captain america / spider-manEveryone’s favorite earnest WWII superhero Steve Rogers (aka Captain America) is coming back to comics and what better opportunity to highlight that than with New Comic Book Day? Marvel’s released a terrific issue that’s focused front and center on Rogers, starting with him attending a Senate Intelligence hearing about the renewed threat of Hydra to peace loving Americans around the world.

    Commander Sharon Carter of SHIELD is in the hot seat, defending the agency for its failure to prevent a Hydra attack in Brussels the previous week. In a sophisticated story turn, SHIELD did stop the Hydra terrorists from blowing up the Chrysler building in New York City, but that wasn’t the only thing the nefarious Hydra was planning. Lack of perfection, fallout from their battles to defend innocent people, it’s very much the story that propels the splendid new Captain America: Civil War movie, and that’s no accident, of course!

    Falcon and Eagle show up as part of the SHIELD team, with a great sequence where they try to stop a renegade Hydra driver, and finally there’s a surprise appearance at the Intelligence hearing too, as most of the action in the story is told in flashbacks, a very cinematic technique that helps propel this story along at a brisk pace.

    The second half of the book is a Spider-Man story called Dead No More, which resurrects Oksana and The Rhino as part of a shadowy plot by, well, someone who doesn’t have our best interests at heart, nor those of business owner Peter Parker. It’s a fun second story to this free issue and together they’re a great pair, well worth picking up!

    Oh, and I’m definitely #TeamCap when it comes to the movie too.

    Steve Rogers, Captain America: Written by Nick Spencer, art by Jesus Saiz, and The Amazing Spider-Man: Written by Dan Slott, art by Javier Garron.

    Review by Dave Taylor.

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