Tag: Matthew Wilson

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    Mighty Thor Faces a Big Challenge From the Gods

    When the gods are fighting each other, ’tis best to get out of their way. That is Thor’s current predicament in Mighty Thor#16.

    The thunder goddess was previously kidnapped and delivered to the Shi’ar gods Sharra and K’ythri. Wanting to flaunt their dominance over their Norse rival, the pair challenges Thor to a contest. While Thor has no interest in these godly games, the Shi’ar threaten to destroy Earth, leaving the goddess little choice.

    Writer Jason Aaron deftly handles the divine dialogue among the three through a combination of highbrow philosophy with some lowbrow humor thrown in. “So begins the kicking of thine hindquarters,” Thor says at one point. But Aaron’s words break new ground for a comic book series as Mighty Thor wrestles with the nature of being a god.

    The Mighty Thor #17
    Pre-Order The Mighty Thor #17

    Not All Gods are Equal

    The Shi’ar gods have little regard for their worshippers. They are merely pawns in a game. Thor knows about suffering all too well, as her alter ego Jane Foster is dying of cancer. She risks her life to defend the people Sharra and K’ythri put into harm’s way because it’s the right thing to do–even though they don’t pay tribute to her.

    Artist Russell Dauterman and colorist Matthew Wilson make a great tag team. There are magnificent close-up battles from Dauterman. And Wilson clearly delineates the many worlds we visit in this issue, from the pastels of the Shi’ar’s M’Kraan Palace to the earth tones of the Asgardian throne room to the blackness of deep space.

    But it’s the richness of the characters–particularly the female ones in Thor and Sif–that make the story special. Thor’s quest to accept the burden of being a god–and to cure herself–make the series worth following.

    THE CHALLENGE OF THE GODS RAGES ON. PRE-ORDER MIGHTY THOR #17

    Mighty Thor #16, Marvel Comics, Released February 15, 2017, Written by Jason Aaron, Art by Russell Dauterman, Color by Matthew Wilson, Lettering by VC’s Joe Sabino; $3.99.

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    Yield or Die

    Doctor Jane Foster has possibly the most awkward double life in comics. When she wields Mjölnir, Foster is the Goddess of Thunder. She has all the power of Thor. Foster reverts to her human form when she isn’t holding the mystic hammer.

    Complicating Foster’s situation is the cancer that is slowly killing her. Every time Foster transforms into Thor, all toxins are purged from her body. That includes the chemo cocktail that keeps her cancer at bay. Few even suspect the mighty god and the dying cancer patient are one and the same.

    The Asgard/Shi’ar War Story Arc Begins Here

    In The Mighty Thor #15, the gates of Asgard are breeched in spectacular fashion. Gladiator and his Shi’ar henchmen blast through Heimdall to cross Bifrost and set upon the city. The Asgardians are caught off guard by having their immovable sentry so easily dispatched.

    It is up to the Thor and the Thunder Guards to thwart the invasion. In a seemingly impossible development, the gods appear to be at a considerable disadvantage. These alien trespassers are not to be underestimated.

    Jason Aaron’s script is packed with action, but also serves to introduce and develop several characters that will be key in the upcoming arc. This is especially impressive considering that Aaron is pulling double duty here. He is also killing it with The Odinson in Unworthy Thor.

    Russell Dauterman showcases his mastery of angles and perspective in this chapter. His panels and gutters tell a story on their own. You won’t find a standard 9-panel grid anywhere in this book. As the chaos builds, Dauterman gets further and further away from ordered layouts, adding another layer of tension to the story.

    DON’T MISS A MIGHTY THOR MOMENT AND PRE-ORDER ISSUE #16 AND ISSUE #17

    The Mighty Thor #15, Marvel Comics, Released January 11, 2017, Rated T+, Written by Jason Aaron, Art by Russell Dauterman, Color by Matthew Wilson, Letters by VC’s Joe Sabino, $3.99

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    You Don’t Know Gamora Until You Read This Comic

    This week we look at two Guardians, Titans, our favorite Slayer and the terror of the deep, Hook Jaw. There were many more comics that came out this week. Check out our other blog articles so see our thoughts on other books. Be sure to comment or share our post on Facebook or Twitter if you like our articles!

    SPOILER ALERT — We try to keep from posting spoilers, but one may sneak through to our reviews now and again. Read with caution, true believers.

    Star-Lord #1
    By: Chip Zdarsky, Kris Anka, Matthew Wilson

    Things are tough for Peter Quill. After the events of Civil War II, the Guardians are stranded on Earth and have gone their separate way for the time being. Kitty Pryde has broken things off with Peter, and the only other person he knows who isn’t missing, dead, or crazy is Howard the Duck. Yeah, you’d be depressed too.

    Chip Zdarsky is in a fine form combining his incredible sense of humor with such relatable and human scenarios. He makes you forget you’re reading a superhero comic when you’re obviously reading a superhero comic. Kris Anka’s pencils expertly transition from the comical and conversational aspects to stunning bar battles with ease.

    Packed full of guest stars, Star-Lord #1 is a great day-in-the-life book. Just in time to get people primed for the new Guardians of the Galaxy movie in just a few months. Don’t miss it. [Mikey N. at TFAW.com]

    SEE ALL GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY “GROUNDED” ISSUES

    Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Season Eleven #2
    By: Joss Whedon, Christos Gage, Rebekah Isaacs, Dan Jackson, Steve Morris

    This issue is all about the aftermath of Buffy Season Eleven #1 (still in stock at press time, BTW).

    And “Safe Zones.”

    Buffy Season Eleven is going to be one of those comic book series that challenges what comics can do to encourage thought and dialogue. Christos Gage (Angel and Faith, Amazing Spider-Man, Avengers Academy) is using Season Eleven as a vehicle to get people to think about civil rights.

    This is a natural extension of the Buffy TV show, and I’m excited to see where they take us this season. As always, Rebekah Isaacs’ (Angel and Faith, Buffy Season Ten) art is unique and fun, but remains true to who the characters are. I’m excited to see **** and Buffy in a relationship where they bring out the best in each other. She deserves that. [Josh C. at TFAW.com]

    PS: I am freaking loving Steve Morris’ covers for the Buffy Season Eleven covers. Absolutely gorgeous!

    JOIN BUFFY SEASON ELEVEN TODAY

    Teen Titans Go #19
    By: Heather Nuhfer, Paul Morrissey, Ivan Cohen, Marcelo DiChiara, Dan Hipp, Jeremy Lawson

    Beast Boy snifs out the future in the first story, and ends up partying with Raven’s Dad! With a few LOL moments, Paul Morissey and Heather Nuhfer made a fun 6-page story that fits right in with the TV shorts.

    “The Herring King” is the second short we get in this $2.99 issue. We find out Beast Boy has a pet Herring (Mentioned in “Coming Soon Comics” issue #12 which has the cover of Teen Titans Rebirth). His herring is sad and they’re taking him home to Springenstandt where they meet characters that resemble Thor and work for a S.H.I.E.L.D. type organization.

    Artist Marcelo DiChiara and Jeremy Lawson work on both stories. They do a fantastic job matching the show’s tone. Both artists really surprised me on how versatile there styles can be. Take a look at Marcelo’s Deviant art page and Jeremy’s website for more!

    This is perfect for comic readers young and old. [Martin M. at TFAW.com]

    ADD TEEN TITANS GO! TO YOUR COLLECTION

    Gamora #1
    By: Nicole Perlman, Marco Checchetto, Esad Ribic, Andres Mossa

    Set long before she ever became of Guardian of the Galaxy, Gamora #1 explores the life of the daughter of Thanos. Back when they were still on speaking terms. A lot of times prequel stories can come across as forced, or containing information that’s not really needed. Gamora, on the other hand, I feel is a great character to explore since not much has been revealed about her time with Thanos. What we get to see in this book is going to be a definitive mission for the character.

    Nicole Perlman captures the voice and tone of the character perfectly. Gamora walks the line between the most dangerous person in the galaxy, split between morality and loyalty to the father she hates. Exploring this is one of the most exciting aspects of the book. Marco Checchetto’s art just keeps further defining him as one of the best pencilers currently working in the industry.

    If you’re looking for a brutal book that gets into the past of one of Marvel’s rising stars, Gamora #1 is a must read. [Mikey N. at TFAW.com]

    EXPLORE GAMORA’S PAST

    Hook Jaw #1
    By: Simon Spurrier, Conor Boyle, Giulia Brusco

    From the pages of the British anthology comic Action (which only lasted a year due to its controversial violence) comes Hook Jaw. A new series from Titan Comics. Who’s no stranger to revitalizing old British Comics (see Johnny Red).

    Hook Jaw introduces us to a crew of a research ship who are trying to prove that Great White Sharks have cooperative behavior. The blood-soaked first issue also gives us a 2 page history of Action and Great White 101. Now I know what you’re thinking. “Isn’t this JAWS as a comic?” and you could say that. What separates this series from JAWS, is that Hook Jaw speaks. Now I don’t mean a Finding Nemo kind of way. We get a tidbit of what’s going on in their head.

    I was intrigued by the premise when I heard about this series months ago and Si Spurrier, Conor Boyle and Giulia Brusco did not disappoint. I will definitely be keeping up with Hook Jaw as they tear through our ship of survivors. [Martin M. at TFAW.com]

    SINK YOUR TEETH INTO HOOK JAW

    What did you think of these books? What should we review next week? Let us know below!

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    Thor Gets His Groove Back

    New Comic Book Day Nov 2nd

    For New Comic Book Day this week, Dark Horse Comics blows up a new issue of World of Tanks, Unworthy Thor begins, and Justice League starts a new arc “OUTBREAK.” It was hard narrowing down this week’s new releases to arrive at this week’s reviews, but that’s the job. 😉 Be sure to comment or share our post on Facebook or Twitter if you like our articles!

    SPOILER ALERT — We try to keep from posting spoilers, but one may sneak through to our reviews now and again. Read with caution, folks.

    World of Tanks #2
    By: Garth Ennis, Carlos Ezquerra, Michael Atiyeh, Isaac Hanford

    After the explosive first issue, our WWII tale of a British tank team fighting against their German counterparts gets more intriguing. The comic splits up parts between the two teams, taking viewpoints from both sides. The book does an especially good job at highlighting where each team is and what pressures await on the battlefield.

    When it comes to comics about war you can’t go wrong when Garth Ennis is writing it; this series is no exception. The artist Carlos Ezquerra has worked with Ennis before on Battlefields, so the series in in highly capable hands. With a style full of grit, you can almost feel the dirt and grim on the pages.

    This series, based around the hugely popular MMO World of Tanks, is sure to satisfy you off the screen and drag you into the trenches. [Martin M. at TFAW.com]

    JUMP INTO THE FIGHT WITH WORLD OF TANKS

    The Unworthy Thor comics at TFAW.com

    The Unworthy Thor #1
    By: Jason Aaron, Olivier Coipel, Matthew Wilson, Russel Dauterman, Joe Sabino

    Though the reason has yet to be revealed, Thor was deemed UNWORTHY in the pages of Original Sin. He has since relinquished the name of Thor and searches for redemption as The Unworthy Thor, and the first issue of the 5-issue miniseries is a fantastic entry–great for new readers and longtime fans of Jason Aaron’s take on the character.

    For my money, there’s no better Thor writer than Jason Aaron. Period. This series is a snapshot of the Odinson at his lowest point. He’s depressed, drinking way too much, and self-loathing. This is the equivalent of a major star getting embroiled in controversy and falling from grace.

    I’m not going to ruin the issue by revealing the events of the last few pages, but I am excited to be along for the ride for what I am calling “Thor Gets His Groove Back.”

    One last thing: I’ve gushed about Aaron’s writing (albeit not as much as I want to), but I would be remiss if I didn’t say that Olivier Coipel’s art and Matthew Wilson’s colors are out of this world. I’ve come to expect a lot from these artists, and that’s because they bring it. Every. Single. Issue. Highest marks for this one, true believers. [Josh C. at TFAW.com]

    VISIT OUR SPECIAL THOR PAGE TODAY!

    Justice League comics at TFAW.com

    Justice League #8
    By: Bryan Hitch, Neil Edwards, Fernando Pasarin

    After the Justice League’s victory over the Kindred, the team has saved the world, and although many were spared, one innocent civilian lost their life. While various members deal with what this means, someone (or something?) hacks into the Watchtower and the Batcave, ultimately putting the entire team — and the world — in danger.

    Told from the point of view of Cyborg, Bryan Hitch does a great job of demonstrating why Victor Stone is one of the most capable and underestimated additions to the League. In a world ruled by connection-based technology, the man who has access to it all could be the greatest hero, but also the most vulnerable to corruption. Neil Edwards’ pencils do a wonderful job of highlighting the somber moments, but hits with a bang in action scenes. He’s an artist who frames shots similar to the way Hitch does in his art, making them a great collaborative team.

    Justice League #8 continues to be a great book featuring the most powerful super team in comics. Be sure to pick up this great jump on point. [Mikey N. at TFAW.com]

    JOIN THE JUSTICE LEAGUE TODAY

    The Wicked and the Divine comics at TFAW.com

    The Wicked and the Divine #23
    By: Kieron Gillen, Jamie McKelvie, Kevin Wada

    Every ninety years, twelve gods incarnate as teenagers. They are loved. They are hated. In two years, they are dead.

    The team behind critically acclaimed Young Avengers and Phonogram have taken us on a hell of a ride for the past two years in The Wicked and The Divine, and the series just keeps getting better. We were able to get our hands on a copy of the WicDiv #23, and I’m here to give you the skinny on the issue and lay out the case for why this is the best series on the shelves.

    I couldn’t think of a better case study to attest to Gillen’s talents as a writer. I’ve been a fan of The Wicked and The Divine from day one, but this issue has really amplified my love of the series. I was reminded of Marvel’s Front Line series of the past decade in that this issue gives us a different perspective of characters like The Morrigan, Baal, Amaterasu, Lucifer, and Woden. I like that the team is experimenting with these one-off issues because they make the reading experience unique. [Josh C. at TFAW.com]

    FIND OUT WHY WICKED AND DIVINE IS BETTER THAN ANY OTHER COMIC BOOK
    BUY WICDIV COMICS & GRAPHIC NOVELS

    Did our review spark your interest in any of these books? Have you read previous issues? Join the conversation and share your experience with us below!

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    Six Reasons The Wicked And Divine Is Better Than Any Other Comic Book

    Wicked and Divine #23 comic book review at TFAW.com

    Every ninety years, twelve gods incarnate as teenagers. They are loved. They are hated. In two years, they are dead.

    The team behind critically acclaimed Young Avengers and Phonogram have taken us on a hell of a ride for the past two years in The Wicked and The Divine, and the series just keeps getting better. We were able to get our hands on a copy of the WicDiv #23, and I’m here to give you the skinny on the issue and lay out the case for why this is the best series on the shelves.

    Keiron Gillen’s Writing

    Wicked & Divine #23 Cover B by Kevin Wada at TFAW.comThe Wicked and The Divine #23 is unique in that it is set up not as a traditional comic, but a one-off issue that reads as an issue of “Pantheon Monthly,” a magazine that has exclusive interviews with some of the series’ principal characters.

    I couldn’t think of a better case study to attest to Gillen’s talents as a writer. I’ve been a fan of The Wicked and The Divine from day one, but this issue has really amplified my love of the series. I was reminded of Marvel’s Front Line series of the past decade in that this issue gives us a different perspective of characters like The Morrigan, Baal, Amaterasu, Lucifer, and Woden. I like that the team is experimenting with these one-off issues because they make the reading experience unique.

    Diverse Set of Characters

    It’s clear that Gillen has put in a lot of effort in charting a course for the series and its characters. With a principal cast of 12 gods and several supporting characters, there’s a lot going on in this series, which has been why WicDiv has been at the top of my reading list for the past two years.

    We’re learning more about the characters each month, and The Wicked and The Divine #23 is no exception. One thing that’s struck me for awhile is that the series features one of the most diverse set of characters we’ve seen for awhile. This isn’t a reboot series where a woman or person of color steps into the titular character’s role–LGBTQ and people of color have been represented from the get-go. It’s refreshing that the WicDiv team is actively trying to create a story for everyone.

    McKelvie x Wilson = Art That is Out of This World

    Writing is only one part of the equation. With comics being a visual storytelling medium, I would argue that art is even more integral to a book’s success. To borrow a baseball term, Jamie McKelvie continues to knock the cover off of the ball–meaning that he isn’t hitting home runs, he’s hitting the art with such ferocity that you can’t help but fall in love in each panel.

    As Gillen has a firm grasp of where these characters’ stories are going, McKelvie’s character designs have been fleshed out. Each character has a unique style and attitude. That’s not to say that things are static–the art has continued to evolve with the characters as they have grown in the series, particularly in the case of Persephone. If you haven’t been reading along, I seriously suggest picking up the Wicked and Divine graphic novels so you can immerse yourself in this art.

    I’ve also been on board with Matthew Wilson’s colors from day one. Collaboration between artists and colorists (also artists, but differentiated as such for sake of clarity) happen every day. This kind of partnership, however, isn’t the norm–McKelvie’s linework and Wilson’s colors go together like fire and heat, milk and Oreos, or conjoined twins. They belong together.

    Mystery & Onions

    Wicked & Divine #23 Cover A by Jamie McKelvie & Matthew Wilson at TFAW.comFrom the beginning, we’ve known the score: within two years’ time, these characters will die. The premise almost dares you not to read the series. The stakes are high and we never really know who’s going to go next. I was surprised at who was killed first as I really liked that character, which kind of makes Gillen the George R.R. Martin of comics.

    We’re always peeling away layers of these characters to find out more details of their motivations, past lives, or the story’s bigger picture. WicDiv represents a type of storytelling that is much more than punch this foe, foil that bad guy’s master plan.

    They’re Effing Gods

    The other thing that really resonates with me is the idea that The Wicked and The Divine expertly deals with themes of fandom, devotion, and religion–these are, after all, gods. Some people love them, others loathe them. It was really fun to read the “interview” with Woden because he is in the latter camp. He’s a racist mysogonist with an inferiority complex.

    I dig the “god” angle of the series a lot.

    It’s a Bold Series

    Like I said before, this is a bold series with a complex set of characters who are brash, powerful, and coming to terms with their fates. Each issue of The Wicked and The Divine is an opportunity for Gillen and McKelvie to yank the rug out from under us. This has happened several times so far, and WicDiv #23 provides a little perspective on the fallout of those moments.

    The team is willing to take this book and its characters to a place where other books from the big two wouldn’t be able to tackle, an that makes this one of the best books on the shelves today.

    ORDER YOUR COPY OF WICKED & DIVINE #23 NOW
    SEE WICKED & DIVINE BOOKS AT TFAW

    Have you been reading WicDiv from the beginning? What’s your favorite moment from the series so far? Are you thinking of trying out for the series for the first time? Join the conversation below.

    The Wicked and The Divine #23, Image Comics, Releases November 2, 2016, Written by Kieron Gillen, Art by Jamie McKelvie and Matthew Wilson; $3.50

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